Browsing All posts tagged under »The Big Issue«

A Life Aquatic (preview)

February 7, 2014

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The Big Issue has just published A Life Aquatic, a light yarn about a notion: to swim every day for a year. Outdoors. Here’s an extract: But trouble lay ahead. Trouble called mountains. Trouble called a river that was too shallow and too dirty. Trouble called a waterfall that was too deep and too rocky. […]

Visiting George (preview)

December 7, 2013

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The Big Issue has just published Visiting George, about visiting a neighbour in a nursing home earlier this year. The non-fiction story is part of The Big Issue Christmas Edition, which features a short piece of fiction by  Scottish author Irvine Welsh (Trainspotting). Here’s an extract from Visiting George: A young bloke bought George’s old […]

Keeping score

July 19, 2013

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Many thanks to The Big Issue, which has just published Keeping score, a light yarn about scoreboards. You would think that having blogged weekly about scoreboards since February 2011 and having written a 3000 word piece for Footy Town back in January that I wouldn’t have much more to say about scoreboards. But Big Issue […]

Colour by numbers (preview)

May 9, 2013

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The Big Issue has just published ‘Colour by numbers’, a story about an itinerant, resourceful man. Here’s an excerpt: Fifteen years ago a blond teenage boy knocked on my door, holding a bucket, some sponges and detergent. “Would you like me to wash your car?” he asked loudly. His voice seemed to echo down the […]

Crossing guards

September 22, 2012

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The Big Issue has just published Crossing guards, in which I blow the whistle on life as a school-crossing supervisor here in Melbourne. Here’s an extract: There is no shortage of delightful moments at the crossing. A ginger-haired grade-four boy bounces his basketball across, weaving expertly between kids and parents. A kindergarten boy wearing a […]

Stop the presses

July 30, 2012

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The Big Issue has just published Stop the presses, a story about working in the old Age building as a Census data-processor. Meanwhile, the Fairfax empire was crumbling, or re-creating itself. Here’s an extract: Near my data-processing desk was a fading imprint in the carpet of ICPOTA (an acronym for ‘In The Classified Pages of […]